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Alan Andrews

Alan Andrews

Alan is the climate program director at Ecojustice, where he leads a team of lawyers across Canada who use litigation and law reform to combat climate change. Prior to joining Ecojustice in 2018, Alan headed the clean air team at ClientEarth (a European environmental law non-profit) in London and Brussels. He started his legal career at the international law firm CMS Cameron McKenna before making the transition to environmental law through a master’s degree in environmental law from the University of London School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). He is passionate about law’s potential to empower people to stand up for their right to a healthy environment.

Brent Kopperson

Brent Kopperson

Brent Kopperson is the founder and Executive Director of Windfall Ecology Centre, a non-profit social enterprise dedicated to building sustainable communities. The creation of Windfall was inspired by a vision of sustainable communities, where economic, social, and environmental needs achieve balance through social innovation, community partnership, and community action.

Brent is a founding Director and former Chair of the Community Power Fund, a founding Director and Chair of the Ontario Sustainable Energy Association (OSEA), the former Chair of Green Communities Canada, and past Director of the World Wind Energy Association. Brent has a significant record of accomplishment in Business, Organization Development, and Community Service. He was born and raised on Vancouver Island and obtained an Honours Degree from the Schulich School of Business at York University. In 2010, Brent was elected a Senior Fellow of the Ashoka Foundation, in recognition of his leadership as a social entrepreneur.

Catherine Abreu

Catherine Abreu

Catherine Abreu is an internationally recognized, award-winning campaigner whose work centres on building powerful coalitions to advance action on climate change. One of the world’s 100 most influential people in climate policy as named by Apolitical in 2019, she has over 15 years of experience campaigning on environmental issues including 7 years in the heart of the climate movement.

Catherine is the Founder & Executive Director of Destination Zero, a new organization focused on climate action and the global energy transition. She was appointed as one of 14 Advisors to Canada’s Net-Zero Advisory Body in early 2021, and sits on the advisory council for the Canadian Institute for Climate Choices. Catherine served as the Executive Director of Climate Action Network – Réseau action climat (CAN-Rac) Canada from 2016 to mid-2021. She joined CAN-Rac Canada after five years spearheading the energy and climate programs at the Ecology Action Centre, one of Atlantic Canada’s largest and longest-running environmental advocacy organizations. In 2020 Catherine was awarded the Jack Layton Progress Prize for her international leadership on climate policy and action and her transformative work as Executive Director of CAN-Rac. She was inducted into Canada’s Clean50 in 2018. An accomplished public speaker, Catherine is honoured to have shared the stage with some of the world’s leading environmental thinkers, including David Suzuki, Christiana Figueres, and Bill McKibbon. Her political commentary has featured in the New York Times, the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star, and the Financial Post. She appears regularly as an expert guest on CBC, CTV, Global and other current affairs television and radio programs.

Christian Holz

Christian Holz

Treasurer

Dr. Christian Holz is a post-doctoral Research Fellow at the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa and the Senior Research Associate of the Climate Equity Reference Project. His focus is on research and advocacy in the context of international climate change politics, especially the multilateral UN climate regime. He is a co-author of an influential series of annual equity and ambition assessment of countries’ climate action pledges, whose first installment – Fair Shares: A Civil Society Equity Review of INDCs (civilsocietyreview.org/report) – was described as the single most influential climate justice intervention at the 2015 UN Paris Climate Summit (and even made it into the speeches of some Heads of States). Christian is also a past Executive Director of Climate Action Network Canada (2012-2014). An active and long-standing participant in the UN climate negotiations, he aims to combine rigorous scholarship and effective advocacy to address the global climate crisis. In general, this research and advocacy work centres on the role of equity and fairness as enablers of ambitious domestic and international action on addressing climate change while protecting the right of the world’s poor to a better life.

Émilie Campbell-Renaud

Émilie Campbell-Renaud

Émilie works as Director of Operations at the Climate Reality Project Canada. The organization, based in Tiohtià:ke (Montreal), is the Canadian branch of an international organization spanning over 10 countries. Its mission is to build and connect networks of empowered individuals in communities across Canada by equipping them with the tools and knowledge to bring about new behaviours and policies that lead to a low-carbon, resilient and just future. Her role mainly consists of developing tools and offering support in order to optimize the organization’s workflow, overall efficiency, and impact. She is also heavily involved in fundraising and reporting, as well as partnership development. Previously, she held the role of Community Engagement and Program Development Manager, during which time she had the immense privilege of supporting Climate Reality Canada’s 1500+ passionate volunteers across Canada.

Fully bilingual in French and English (and functional in German as well), Émilie holds a Masters of Environment from Université de Sherbrooke, where she focused her studies on the ecological and social benefits of natural spaces, notably wetlands. Throughout her career, she has touched a variety of fields, ranging from business management to municipal work, and finally found her home in the ENGO sector in 2017, where she’s been involved in grassroots organizing and empowerment ever since. She has led a wide variety of workshops and given countless presentations to empower citizens for action, and managed several environmental projects (notably on the topics of water bank protection, waste management, and Environmental Site Assessments for soil decontamination).

Émilie is a firm believer in the power of grassroots organizing for catalyzing systemic and policy changes. What keeps her most energized about overcoming the climate crisis is the power of shared challenges to unite people behind common goals.

When she’s not working or reading, Émilie is a competitive synchronized skater, passionate motorcyclist, and an avid camper. She also runs her own small makeup and nail business – called Beauty in the Abyss – which enables her to channel her inner artist.

Graeme Reed

Graeme Reed

Of mixed Anishinaabe and European descent, Graeme works at the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) as a senior policy advisor, ensuring federal and international climate policy safeguards First Nations rights, jurisdiction and knowledge. He has presented to the Canadian Council of Ministers of Environment (CCME), participated in the First Minister’s Meeting negotiating the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, and participated in multiple expert committees, such as the Expert Panel on Climate Adaptation and Resilience Results. During this time, he has had the opportunity to represent the AFN at the COP 23, COP 24, and COP 25 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Since 2019, he has been the Co-Chair of the International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change. In his spare time, he is a doctoral candidate at the University of Guelph, studying the intersection of Indigenous governance, environmental governance, and the climate crisis. He is an Action Canada Fellow, a Top 30 Under 30 in Sustainability, and a St. Paul’s Young Alumni Award winner.

Jana Jandal Alrifi

Jana Jandal Alrifi

Jana Jandal Alrifai is an Arab-Canadian climate justice organizer living in so-called Windsor, Ontario. She is passionate about social change and the diverse voices that help lead it. She is a co-founder of Fridays For Future Windsor-Essex and an activist with Climate Strike Canada. She has worked on a variety of campaigns like Save Okavango Delta, national days of actions and other local issues.

Jen Lash

Jen Lash

Vice-Chair

Jen Lash, Executive Director at the Sisu Institute, has worked on conservation issues in Canada for over 25 years. In her capacity at Sisu Institute, she works with First Nations and ENGOs to address climate change issues and promote the transition to a clean energy economy. Jen collaborates with partners across Canada to stop the development of fossil fuel infrastructure, implement climate policies that ensure Canada meets its Paris targets, and help shape new environmental legislation. Jen lives in British Columbia.

Joy Kennedy

Joy Kennedy

Chair

Joy Kennedy is a consultant on ecological justice issues. A long-time member of various social and ecological justice boards, networks and committees, she served on the board as treasurer of the Climate Action Network (CAN-Rac) for many years.

A former staff person of the United Church of Canada, the Anglican Church of Canada, KAIROS Canada, and the Canadian Council of Churches, she concentrates on the moral and spiritual nature of global challenges and solutions to the economic and ecological threats the Earth Community faces. She is an active participant in the Canadian Interfaith Conversation and is Convener of the Canadian Interfaith Fast for the Climate. She is a member of the World Council of Churches Working Group on Climate Change with whom, and within an Interfaith Liaison Committee, she engages with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) processes to bring a faith perspective to the negotiations and ongoing work for climate justice. As a committed activist and a grandmother she works for a sustainable future for all.

Miranda Baksh

Miranda Baksh

Miranda Baksh is an environmental educator, climate action catalyst, and one of York University’s top 30 changemakers under 30 making a difference in the world. She obtained her Masters in Environmental Studies from York University and shortly after co-founded a non-profit organization based in her hometown, Brampton, The Community Climate Council. Her passion for biodiversity conservation led her to study EcoHealth and Disaster Risk Reduction in Costa Rica and Belize which brought her closer to local climate activism. She currently works at Environmental Defence and enjoys hiking on trails across Ontario.

Nhattan Nguyen

Nhattan Nguyen

Nhattan (he/him) was born and raised in Tiohtià:ke (Montreal), on the traditional unceded territory of the Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk). Second generation Vietnamese, his family fled the aftermath of the war in their country. Nhattan started as an Executive Assistant with Indigenous Climate Action in June 2021.

Fluent in both English and French, Nhattan has almost 10 years of experience in organizing and movement photography, supporting the participation and collaboration of various communities in environmental decision-making and advocacy, from helping youth challenge the status quo at UN climate negotiations to working with frontline and grassroots activists fighting for Indigenous rights and racial justice. He was recently the Operations and Outreach Coordinator at Climate Action Network. Nhattan is completing the Master of Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership program at Carleton University, with the aim to explore how to make our organizational policies and movement spaces more safe, just, and joyful through learning from emerging ideas of accountability, abolition, decolonization, healing justice, transformative justice, and trauma stewardship. When not working or indulging in baking therapy in his kitchen, you can find him out and about on trails or rivers, cycling, running, skiing, skating, or paddling!

Tara Peel

Tara Peel

Tara Peel works as Political Assistant to the President of the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC). Previously, she was the National Representative for Health, Safety and Environment at CLC, where she was responsible for developing national campaigns and providing analysis on a variety of workplace health, environmental health and sustainability issues. Tara is a member of the Board of Directors of Climate Action Network Canada and the national steering committee for the Green Economy Network. She also serves as a Member of the Council of Governors for the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety. Previously, as Policy and Special Projects Coordinator for the Manitoba Federation of Labour (MFL), she was responsible for implementing MFL priorities, including a focus on health, safety and environment.

Tony Snow

Tony Snow

Tony Snow is a member of the Stoney Nakoda First Nation. One of seven children of the late Dr. Rev. Chief John Snow Sr., Tony was raised with his traditional cultural teachings and has worked for decades as an environmental technician and cultural advocate for Indigenous people in the resource development industry. As a traditional knowledge keeper, theologian and environmental activist, Tony has worked to protect the interests of First Nations in mediation, reclamation and traditional land use. He currently works as the Indigenous Minister for the Chinook Winds Region in southern Alberta and serves on the United Church of Canada Climate Advisory Circle and with the For The Love Of Creation campaign. Tony attended COP25 and COP26 with the UCC observer delegation in Madrid and Glasgow. Tony Snow is now Rev. Tony Snow.

Anna Johnston

Anna Johnston

Anna Johnston is a Staff Lawyer at West Coast Environmental Law, where her work focuses on strengthening federal environmental laws and environmental assessment reform. She earned her law degree from the University of Victoria in 2010, where she was enrolled in the Environmental Law Clinic intensive stream and was an active member of the Environmental Law Club. In 2010 Anna interned at the Institute of Environmental Law and Governance in Nairobi, Kenya before completing her articles at Ecojustice Canada. Called to the bar in 2011, Anna practiced as a sole practitioner in Aboriginal and environmental law before she joined West Coast in 2013.

Anna has represented community and Indigenous groups on environmental assessments of major energy projects in British Columbia and Alberta and has provided environmental legal education and support to communities across Canada. She currently co-chairs the national Environmental Planning and Assessment Caucus of the Canadian Environmental Network and sits on a Multi-Interest Advisory Committee appointed by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to assist in the federal review of Canada’s environmental assessment processes.She firmly believes that rural, northern and Indigenous communities should not bear a disproportionate cost of the effects of resource development, and throughout her work seeks to establish planning and decision-making processes that will result in sustainable and equitably-distributed outcomes for all.